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Courtney Thomas, Assistant Professor, Community Health Sciences, UCLA
The Racial Self-Awareness Framework of Race-Based Stress, Coping, and Health: Evaluating Biopsychosocial Pathways among African Americans
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Creating Supportive Environments for LGBT Older Adults: An Efficacy Evaluation of Staff Training in a Senior Living Facility
Supportive housing later in life tends to be a key concern for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) elders. Most senior care providers are un(der)prepared to meet the needs of older LGBT adults. This study evaluated the efficacy of a 4 h, face-to-face, research-based, LGBT-diversity training designed to improve senior housing facility staff’s cultural competency regarding the needs of LGBT elders. Findings from this study found a significant increase in LGBT content knowledge between pre- and post-intervention assessments and a significant decrease in perceived preparedness when working with LGBT elders. These effects remained significant after controlling for staff designation, religion, educational attainment, and training session. Findings suggest that staff’s cultural competence affected their perceived readiness to address LGBT elders’ needs. Implications are related to the concept of cultural humility or the lifelong process of understanding others’ experiences based on the recognition of lack of un(der)preparedness to create a culturally supportive residential environment.
Located in MPRC People / Jessica N Fish, Ph.D. / Jessica N Fish Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Cumulative Psychosocial Stress and Ideal Cardiovascular Health in Older Women: Data by Race/Ethnicity
  BACKGROUND: Research implicates acute and chronic stressors in racial/ethnic health disparities, but the joint impact of multiple stressors on racial/ethnic disparities in cardiovascular health is unknown. METHODS: In 25 062 women (24 053 white; 256 Hispanic; 440 black; 313 Asian) articipating in the Women's Health Study follow-up cohort, we examined the relationship between cumulative psychosocial stress (CPS) and ideal cardiovascular health (ICH), as defined by the American Heart Association's 2020 strategic Impact Goals. This health metric includes smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diet, blood pressure, total cholesterol, and glucose, with higher levels indicating more ICH and less cardiovascular risk (score range, 0-7). We created a CPS score that summarized acute stressors (eg, negative life events) and chronic stressors (eg, work, work-family spillover, financial, discrimination, relationship, and neighborhood) and traumatic life event stress reported on a stress questionnaire administered in 2012 to 2013 (score range, 16-385, with higher scores indicating higher levels of stress). RESULTS: White women had the lowest mean CPS scores (white: 161.7±50.4; Hispanic: 171.2±51.7; black: 172.5±54.9; Asian: 170.8±50.6; P overall <0.01). Mean CPS scores remained higher in Hispanic, black, and Asian women than in white women after adjustment for age, socioeconomic status (income and education), and psychological status (depression and anxiety) ( P<0.01 for each). Mean ICH scores varied by race/ethnicity ( P<0.01) and were significantly lower in black women and higher in Asian women compared with white women (β-coefficient [95% CI]: Hispanics, -0.02 [-0.13 to -0.09]; blacks, -0.34 [-0.43 to -0.25]; Asians, 0.34 [0.24 to 0.45]); control for socioeconomic status and CPS did not change these results. Interactions between CPS and race/ethnicity in ICH models were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Both CPS and ICH varied by race/ethnicity. ICH remained worse in blacks and better in Asians compared with whites, despite taking into account socioeconomic factors and CPS.
Located in Retired Persons / Natalie Slopen, Sc.D. / Natalie Slopen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Current tobacco use, nicotine dependence, and transitions across stages of alcohol involvement: A latent transition analysis approach
This study aims to examine the (a) probability of transition between stages of alcohol involvement and (b) influence of tobacco use and nicotine dependence on transitions. Data came from Waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Latent transition analysis estimated the probability of transitioning between stages of alcohol involvement across waves and the impact of tobacco use and nicotine dependence at Wave 1 on transitions. Males reporting current tobacco use but no dependence at Wave 1 were more likely to progress from No Problems to Moderate Problems (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.44, 2.22]) and from No Problems to Severe Problems (aOR = 2.44; 95% CI [1.25, 4.77]) than nontobacco users. Females reporting current tobacco use but no dependence were more likely to progress from No Problems to Moderate Problems (aOR = 2.00; 95% CI [1.37, 2.94]) and from No Problems to Severe Problems (aOR = 2.87; 95% CI [1.34, 6.13]). Females reporting current tobacco use and dependence were more likely than females not using tobacco to transition from Moderate to No Problems (aOR = 2.10; 95% CI [1.04, 4.22]). Results suggest that tobacco use is a preceding correlate of progression in alcohol involvement among males and females. Among females, tobacco use and nicotine dependence are also related to alcohol involvement recovery.
Located in MPRC People / Kerry Green, Ph.D. / Kerry Green Publications
Cynthia Feliciano, Washington University in St. Louis
Contextual Inequalities and Socioeconomic Outcomes among Adult Children of U.S. Immigrants
Located in Coming Up
Dagher and Green: Substance abuse and depression in young adulthood may have long-term socioeconomic effects
Treatment for substance abuse and mental health problems should be integrated in order to achieve better outcomes
Located in News
Dagher: Prevention of postpartum depression could yield health care cost savings
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health R18 study is first to examine the relation between postpartum depression and health services expenditures
Located in Research / Selected Research
Dan Tang, Visiting Associate Professor in Maryland Population Research Center
Living Arrangements, Social Networks and Depressive Symptoms Among Urban and Rural Older Adults in China
Located in Coming Up
Das Gupta research cited in Gorakhpur tragedy story
Opinion piece calls to make "provision of public goods" central to Indian democracy
Located in News
Dean Spears, University of Texas at Austin
Neonatal death in private hospitals in north India: Preliminary evidence of a new mortality puzzle
Located in Coming Up