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Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Does gang membership pay? Illegal and legal earnings through emerging adulthood
Gang membership is believed to impede success in the legitimate economic market while simultaneously supporting success in the illegal market. We extend the study of the economic effects of gang membership by using a within-and between-individual analytic design, decomposing gang membership into multiple statuses (i.e., entering a gang,continuously in a gang, leaving a gang, and inactive gang membership), examining legal and illegal earnings simultaneously, and accounting for factors endogenous to gang membership that may contribute to economic achievement.By using panel data from 1,213 individuals who participated in the Pathways to Desistance Study to conduct a multi level path analysis, we find that active gang membership status is unrelated to legal earnings. Alternatively,entering a gang is associated with increased illegal earnings, attributable to changes in delinquent peers and drug use, whereas leaving a gang has a direct relationship with decreased illegal earnings. Our results indicate that the positive economic effect of gang membership (i.e., illegal earnings and total earnings) is short-lived and that, on balance,the sum of the gang membership experience does not “pay”in terms of overall earnings.
Located in MPRC People / Jean McGloin, Ph.D. / Jean McGloin Publications
Dylan Roby comments on California’s new contract worker law
Companies challenge the new contract worker law by cutting down their working hours
Located in News
Dynamism diminished: The role of housing markets and credit conditions
John Haltiwanger looks at the effect of housing market shocks on young businesses and start-ups
Located in Research / Selected Research
Econ Seminar: Labor/Public Finance/Development
"Creating Moves to Opportunity: Experimental Evidence on Barriers to Neighborhood Choice"
Located in Coming Up
Economics Seminar: The Effect of Insurance on Emergency Room Visits: An Analysis of the 2006 Massachusetts Health Reform
Sarah Miller, University of Michigan
Located in Coming Up
File Troff document (with manpage macros)Eliciting and Utilizing Willingness-to-Pay: Evidence from Field Trials in Northern Ghana
Raymond Guiteras, University of Maryland; James Berry, Cornell University; Greg Fischer, London School of Economics // Keywords: price mechanism, heterogeneous treatment effects, health behavior, Becker-DeGroot-Marschak, field experiments; 2015-017
Located in Research / Working Papers / WP Documents
Emily Wiemers, University of Massachusetts
Multigenerational Relationships and Economic Resources Among Black and White Families in the US
Located in Coming Up
Engaging Women in the Market for Mobile Money
Faculty Associate Jessica Goldberg awarded National Science Foundation three-year grant to examine questions of participation and impact for women
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Enhancing socio-ecological resilience in coastal regions through collaborative science, knowledge exchange and social networks: a case study of the Deal Island Peninsula, USA
Collaborative science brings together diverse stakeholders to share knowledge and form networks that in turn can be foundational to policies and practices to increase socio-ecological resilience. In this article, we present results from a collaborative science project that employed collaborative learning methods to develop a network of local, regional, state and academic stakeholders. These stakeholders had little social interaction prior to the project and represented a diversity of views, positions and responsibilities. They shared in common a concern for the effects of climate change on a coastal socio-ecological system and the desire to reduce vulnerabilities and enhance resilience. Through ethnographic and survey methods, we found that collaborative science and learning promoted the exchange of cultural and environmental knowledge and expertise among individuals who previously had no sustained interaction. Stakeholders perceived these exchanges as worthwhile in that they allowed individuals to express viewpoints and share knowledge and expertise, which was seen to have the potential to increase socio-ecological resilience. Our results suggest that social networks can emerge from collaborative science and learning projects and can become formally organized and help foster opportunities to enhance socio-ecological resilience.
Located in MPRC People / Michael Paolisso, Ph.D. / Michael Paolisso Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Environmental Justice and Infectious Disease: Gaps, Issues, and Research Needs
The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between environmental changes and infectious diseases and their impact on health in environmental justice (EJ) communities. The evolution of EJ science and research is contingent upon an integrated approach that takes into account social processes and environmental changes to address the burden of infectious diseases in EJ communities. We recognize that infectious disease and environmental justice is novel and calls for more research in this area, especially as the focus of public health shifts towards an ecologic and social approach to disease prevention. We attempt to explore in further detail how environmental changes such as urbanization, agriculture, and climate variability could potentially influence pathogen dynamics, vector transmission, host susceptibility, and disease outcomes among environmental justice populations.
Located in MPRC People / Sacoby Wilson, Ph.D., M.S. / Sacoby Wilson Publications