Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

You are here: Home

Search results

441 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type









































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Richardson comments on Washington DC murder rate
Perpetual stress brings long-term health impacts
Located in News
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Risk and protective factors associated with BV chronicity among women in Rakai, Uganda
Objectives To assess risk and protective factors associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) chronicity ascertained by Nugent score criteria. Methods A longitudinal cohort study included 255 sexually experienced, postmenarcheal women who provided weekly self-collected vaginal swabs for up to 2 years. Vaginal swabs were scored using Nugent criteria and classified as normal (≤3), intermediate (4–6) and Nugent-BV (≥7). Detailed behavioural/health information were assessed every 6 months. A per-woman longitudinal summary measure of BV chronicity was defined as the percentage of each woman’s weekly vaginal assessments scored as Nugent-BV over a 6-month interval. Risk and protective factors associated with BV chronicity were assessed using multiple linear regression with generalised estimating equations. Results Average BV chronicity was 39% across all follow-up periods. After adjustment, factors associated with BV chronicity included baseline Nugent-BV (β=35.3, 95% CI 28.6 to 42.0) compared with normal baseline Nugent scores and use of unprotected water for bathing (ie, rainwater, pond, lake/stream) (β=12.0, 95% CI 3.4 to 20.5) compared with protected water sources (ie, well, tap, borehole). Women had fewer BV occurrences if they were currently pregnant (β=−6.6, 95% CI −12.1 to 1.1), reported consistent condom use (β=−7.7, 95% CI −14.2 to 1.3) or their partner was circumcised (β=−5.8, 95% CI −11.3 to 0.3). Conclusions Factors associated with higher and lower values of BV chronicity were multifactorial. Notably, higher values of BV chronicity were associated with potentially contaminated bathing water. Future studies should examine the role of waterborne microbial agents in the pathogenesis of BV.
Located in MPRC People / Marie Thoma, Ph.D. / Marie Thoma Publications
Risk Factors for Infant Mortality in Maryland
Maryland Health Care Commission project includes Marian Moser-Jones, Edmond Shenassa and Marie Thoma
Located in Research / Selected Research
Roberts studies health of demographically diverse population
PLOT project uses natural experiment of a new light rail line in Prince Georges County, Maryland
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article ReferenceRurality, presence of broiler operations, and community socioeconomic factors influence the risk of Campylobacteriosis in Maryland
Objectives. We evaluated the combined impact of community-level environmental and socioeconomic factors on the risk of campylobacteriosis. Methods. We obtained Campylobacter case data (2002–2010; n = 3694) from the Maryland Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network. We obtained community-level socioeconomic and environmental data from the 2000 US Census and the 2007 US Census of Agriculture. We linked data by zip code. We derived incidence rate ratios by Poisson regressions. We mapped a subset of zip code–level characteristics. Results. In zip codes that were 100% rural, incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of campylobacteriosis were 6 times (IRR = 6.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.19, 11.97) greater than those in urban zip codes. In zip codes with broiler chicken operations, incidence rates were 1.45 times greater than those in zip codes without broilers (IRR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.34, 1.58). We also observed higher rates in zip codes whose populations were predominantly White and had high median incomes. Conclusions. The community and environment in which one lives may significantly influence the risk of campylobacteriosis.
Located in MPRC People / Robin Puett, Ph.D. / Robin Puett Publications
Sacoby Wilson cited in environmental justice and green COVID-19 recovery
The disparities of infections on essential workers and communities of color reinforce how any climate plan must focus on equity.
Located in News
Sacoby Wilson cited in housing and health issue
Housing is a social determinant of health
Located in News
Sacoby Wilson comments on Social Factors of COVID-19 Pandemic Impacts on Prince Georgian's Health on Capital Gazette
In Maryland and across the nation, black people are becoming ill and dying at disproportionate rates because of the coronavirus pandemic.
Located in News
Sacoby Wilson describes community "sacrifice zones" in Wired
COVID impact on areas of high particulate concentrations is greater
Located in News
Sacoby Wilson featured in Bloomberg on environmental injustice
Congressional Black Caucus members called on to fight environmental injustice affecting poor black neighborhoods
Located in News