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Theodore Joyce, Baruch College
The Impact of Parental Involvement Laws on the Abortion Rate of Minors
Located in Coming Up
Liana Sayer's findings featured in New York Times on universal child care
American society and government disagree on mothers' work
Located in News
Richard Alba, City University of New York
The Great Demographic Illusion:  Majority, Minority, and the Expanding American Mainstream
Located in Coming Up
Amanda Geller, New York University
Police Contact, Mental Health, and Health Disparities among Urban Teens
Located in Coming Up
Steven Haas, Penn State University
The Long-Arm of Conflict: How Timing Shapes the Long-term Impacts of Childhood Exposure to War
Located in Coming Up
Taylor Hargrove, University of North Carolina
Health Contextualized: Inequalities in Physiological Function at the Intersection of Race, Skin Color, and Place
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Medicaid Benefit Generosity and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Medicaid Adult Vision Benefits
This paper examines whether Medicaid adult vision coverage affects labor market activity using state-by-year changes to these benefits.We find that vision benefits increase hours worked and occupational skill requirements, but no consistent evidence of changes on the extensive employment margin. Intensive margin effects could be facilitated by decreased barriers to transportation - when a state covers vision services, beneficiaries are more likely to commute to work by car or motorcycle rather than other modes. Our study suggests that, conditional on eligibility, Medicaid can have a positive effect on labor market activity by expanding access to services that enable work. JEL codes:I13, I18, J22, H75. Link to online-before-print version
Located in MPRC People / Michel Boudreaux, Ph.D. / Michel Boudreaux Publications
Philip Cohen comments on birth rate anxiety
Less Sex, Fewer Babies, Blame - no, wait . . .
Located in News
Wade Jacobsen, UMD Criminology
Juvenile Arrest and Interpersonal Exclusion: Rejection, Withdrawal, and Homophily among Peers
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Expensive Childcare and Short School Days = Lower Maternal Employment and More Time in Childcare? Evidence from the American Time Use Survey
This study investigates the relationship between maternal employment and state-to-state differences in childcare cost and mean school day length. Pairing state-level measures with an individual-level sample of prime working-age mothers from the American Time Use Survey (2005–2014; n = 37,993), we assess the multilevel and time-varying effects of childcare  costs  and  school  day  length  on  maternal  full-time  and  part-time  employment  and  childcare  time.  We  find  mothers’ odds of full-time employment are lower and part-time employment higher in states with expensive childcare and shorter school days. Mothers spend more time caring for children in states where childcare is more expensive and as childcare costs increase. Our results suggest that expensive childcare and short school days are important barriers to maternal employment and, for childcare costs, result in greater investments in childcare time. Politicians engaged in national debates about federal childcare policies should look to existing state childcare structures for policy guidance. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/2378023119860277
Located in MPRC People / Liana C. Sayer, Ph.D. / Liana Sayer Publications