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Promoting Economic Recovery After COVID-19
Melissa Kearney and colleagues offer bi-partisan plan for economic recovery
Located in Research / Selected Research
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Race-Ethnicity, Class, and Unemployment Dynamics: Do Macroeconomic Shifts Alter Existing Disadvantages?
Research indicates that individuals of different races, ethnic backgrounds, and class origins differ in their unemployment rates. We know less, however, about whether these differences result from the differing groups’ unequal hazards of entering or exiting unemployment and even less about how economic fluctuations moderate the ethnoracial and class-origin gaps in the long-term risks of transitioning into and out of unemployment. Using Rounds 1–17 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and event history models, we show that non-Hispanic blacks become more similar to non-Hispanic whites in their paces of entering unemployment as their local unemployment rate rises, perhaps because jobs largely closed to the former are eliminated in a greater proportion during recessions. Nonetheless, blacks’ relatively slow pace of transitioning from unemployment to having a job decelerates further with economic downturns. By contrast, Hispanics’ paces of entering and exiting unemployment relative to non-Hispanic whites hardly change with local unemployment rates, despite unemployed Hispanics’ slower rate of transitioning to having a job. With respect to class origin, we find that the advantages in both unemployment entry and recovery of young men with relatively educated parents diminish with economic deterioration. Based on these results, we suggest that facing economic pressure, employers’ preference for workers of a higher class origin is more malleable than their preference for whites over blacks, making unemployed blacks especially disadvantaged in uncertain economic times. DOI :  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rssm.2019.100422
Located in Retired Persons / Wei-hsin Yu, Ph.D. / Wei-hsin Yu Publications
Sandra Hofferth interviews Daniel Hamermesh
Comments on work-non-work balance, trends for rich-country time use, and labor market participation changes since 2000
Located in News
Seminar Series: Aligning Learning Incentives of Students and Teachers: Results from a Social Experiment in Mexican High School (CANCELED)
Susan W. Parker, Professor, Division of Economics, Center for Research and Teaching in Economics (Centro De Investigacion Y Docencia Economicas, A.C. - CIDE) *This seminar will be rescheduled for Spring 2012.
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Behavioral Response to Information? Circumcision, Information, and HIV Prevention
Rebecca L. Thornton, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Michigan
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Micro-Ordeals and Preventative Health Products: Evidence on Short-Term Take-Up and Habit Formation
Vivian Hoffmann, Assistant Professor, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Maryland
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Risk Tolerance and Parental Investment in Children
Jeffrey Borowitz, Student Scholar, Department of Economics, University of Maryland
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Robert Moffitt, Professor of Economics, Johns Hopkins University
The Deserving Poor and the U.S. Welfare System
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Sergio Urzua, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Maryland
Loans for Higher Education: Does the Dream Come True?
Located in Coming Up
Seminar Series: Suicide and Property Rights in India
Garance Genicot, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, Georgetown University
Located in Coming Up