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Philip Cohen comments on American's new marriage trend in NBC News
Social media adds to the pressure of a perfect marriage
Located in News
Philip Cohen featured in The New York Times on gender-neutral pronoun
Americans still reluctant to use the pronoun "she" to describe the president, even hypothetically
Located in News
Philip Cohen comments on Americans' dropping divorce rate on NPR
Divorce has become more acceptable, less stigmatized, but also less common
Located in News
Philip Cohen featured in USA Today on U.S. Divorce Rate
Millennials are contributing to the declining divorce rate in U.S.
Located in News
Article ReferenceThe rising marriage mortality gap among Whites
Although the decline in marriage has been cited as a possible contributor to the “despair” afflicting marginalized White communities, these studies have not directly considered mortality by marital status. This paper uses complete death certificate data from the Mortality Multiple Cause Files with American Community Survey data to examine age-specific mortality rates for married and non-married people from 2007 to 2017. The overall rise in White mortality is limited almost exclusively to those who are not married, for men and women. By comparison, mortality for Blacks and Hispanics has fallen or remained flat regardless of marital status (except for young, single Hispanic men). Analysis by education level shows death rates have risen most for Whites with the lowest education, but have also increased for those with high school or some college. Because mortality has risen faster for unmarried Whites at all but the lowest education levels, there has been an increase in the marriage mortality ratio. Mortality differentials are an increasingly important component of the social hierarchy associated with marital status.
Located in MPRC People / Philip Cohen, Ph.D. / Philip Cohen Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Coming Divorce Decline
This article analyzes U.S. divorce trends over the past decade and considers their implications for future divorce rates. Modeling women’s odds of divorce from 2008 to 2017 using marital events data from the American Community Survey, I find falling divorce rates with or without adjustment for demographic covariates. Age-specific divorce rates show that the trend is driven by younger women, which is consistent with longer term trends showing uniquely high divorce rates among people born in the Baby Boom period. Finally, I analyze the characteristics of newly married women and estimate the trend in their likelihood of divorcing based on the divorce models. The results show falling divorce risks for more recent marriages. The accumulated evidence thus points toward continued decline in divorce rates. The United States is progressing toward a system in which marriage is rarer and more stable than it was in the past.
Located in MPRC People / Philip Cohen, Ph.D. / Philip Cohen Publications
Philip Cohen comments on declining divorce rate in Michigan in Lansing State Journal
Dropping divorce rate among women age under 45 in Michigan may indicate later but stabler marriage
Located in News
Philip Cohen comments on the rising co-living arrangements
Sharing households seems to be the solution facing rising housing costs in Miami
Located in News
Philip Cohen comments on U.S. women's selectivity in marriage
Well educated women tend to choose long lasting marriages
Located in News
Philip Cohen comments on birth rate anxiety
Less Sex, Fewer Babies, Blame - no, wait . . .
Located in News