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Techreport Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Most Self-Employed Workers Are Independent Contractors
Located in MPRC People / Katharine Abraham, Ph.D. / Katharine Abraham Publications
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)The Importance of Informal Work in Supplementing Household Income
According to a Federal Reserve survey, nearly 30 percent of respondents reported informal work for pay in the prior month, ranging from online work to personal services to selling goods. Informal work plays a particularly important role in the household finances of minorities, the unemployed, and those who report financial hardship. Independent contractors, other self-employed, and those with unpredictable work schedules are especially reliant on informal work to supplement their income, possibly symptomatic of inadequate or unstable earnings associated with these types of work.
Located in MPRC People / Katharine Abraham, Ph.D. / Katharine Abraham Publications
Workshop - Keith Finlay, US Census Bureau, Labor Economist
Research Linking Criminal Justice Data with Socioeconomic Survey and Administrative Records at the Census Bureau
Located in Coming Up
Katharine Abraham cited in job sharing feature
Benefits of Work Sharing programs
Located in News
Melanie Wasserman, UCLA Anderson School of Management
Informed Choices: Gender Gaps in Career Advice
Located in Coming Up
Article Reference Troff document (with manpage macros)Race-Ethnicity, Class, and Unemployment Dynamics: Do Macroeconomic Shifts Alter Existing Disadvantages?
Research indicates that individuals of different races, ethnic backgrounds, and class origins differ in their unemployment rates. We know less, however, about whether these differences result from the differing groups’ unequal hazards of entering or exiting unemployment and even less about how economic fluctuations moderate the ethnoracial and class-origin gaps in the long-term risks of transitioning into and out of unemployment. Using Rounds 1–17 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and event history models, we show that non-Hispanic blacks become more similar to non-Hispanic whites in their paces of entering unemployment as their local unemployment rate rises, perhaps because jobs largely closed to the former are eliminated in a greater proportion during recessions. Nonetheless, blacks’ relatively slow pace of transitioning from unemployment to having a job decelerates further with economic downturns. By contrast, Hispanics’ paces of entering and exiting unemployment relative to non-Hispanic whites hardly change with local unemployment rates, despite unemployed Hispanics’ slower rate of transitioning to having a job. With respect to class origin, we find that the advantages in both unemployment entry and recovery of young men with relatively educated parents diminish with economic deterioration. Based on these results, we suggest that facing economic pressure, employers’ preference for workers of a higher class origin is more malleable than their preference for whites over blacks, making unemployed blacks especially disadvantaged in uncertain economic times. DOI :  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rssm.2019.100422
Located in MPRC People / Wei-hsin Yu, Ph.D. / Wei-hsin Yu Publications